How to say happy Diwali

Diwali: Indian city Ayodhya lights 300,000 lamps to celebrate

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Diwali is a five-day religious holiday that began on Tuesday this week. The first day, Dhanteras, landed on November 2, marking the 15th day of the Hindu month of Kartik. Today marks Choti Diwali, with Diwali on November 4, Padwa on November 5 and Bhai Duj on November 6.

How do you say happy Diwali?

Diwali is an elaborate festival which sees observers deck their homes and workplaces with assorted lights and an art form of colourful patterns named Rangoli.

People also eat sweet treats such as lapsi halwa and carry out elaborate public celebrations.

As a Hindu, Sikh and Jain festival, people celebrate Diwali with a range of greetings.

Many of these go beyond the traditional “happy Diwali”, as the festival has a multi-faceted purpose.

Observers commemorate the “victory of light over darkness, good over evil, and knowledge over ignorance” associated with several gods across participating religions.

According to the Times of India, celebratory greetings depend on personal choice, but people have several from which they can choose.

For a straightforward greeting, people could say “Happy Diwali” if they prefer.

Alternatively, they could draw on some of the festival’s central themes.

Another potential greeting includes: “With the light of beautiful diyas and holy chants, may happiness and prosperity fill your life forever.”

Or they could say: “I hope this Diwali brings light to your life.”

They could also expand on this by saying: “May this auspicious occasion light up your life with happiness, joy and peace.”

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In 2021, revellers won’t have to follow the same rules as last year, with Covid restrictions now all but eliminated.

But some organisers have faced a host of new issues as infections linger in the UK and the supply chain crumbles.

Shops supplying items for the festival, including clothing and food, have voiced concerns over deliveries from other countries such as India.

Sital Raja-Arjan, a Hindu one-stop-shop owner in Bolton, told the BBC shortages have cost her 50 percent of her business.

She cannot buy many of the goods she sells, such as halwa, locally, and this year received 900 packets where she would traditionally get 6,000 to 7,000.

Other revellers have had to forgo ingredients required for traditional meals they would usually receive.

Volunteer groups have come forward to help struggling families during Diwali, offering food hampers ahead of the festival.

The Diwali Basket Brigade said it had raised £25,000, enough to buy and distribute 2,500.

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