Boris Johnson carries son Wilf on shoulders as he returns from his run

Boris Johnson carries son Wilf on his shoulders as he returns from his run – as furious protesters gather outside Downing Street over ‘shambolic’ handing of Afghanistan chaos

  • Mr Johnson was pictured carrying his son this morning after going jogging
  • The PM, 57, wore a t-shirt, floral shorts and what appeared to be smart suit shoes 
  • He was seen before Afghanistan protesters marched through Central London  

Wearing a blue sweater, Boris Johnson’s toddler son Wilfred was today pictured on his father’s shoulders.

The Prime Minister was seen getting out of his car in Downing Street with his young son after returning from a run this morning.

Standing beneath his son’s inherited shock of blond hair, Mr Johnson, 57, was wearing a black t-shirt, floral shorts and what appeared to be smart suit shoes. 

Mr Johnson was seen before thousands of protesters today rallied outside Downing Street to demonstrate against Britain’s response to the Afghanistan crisis. 

Marchers also took over Oxford Circus and Hyde Park to criticise the Government’s handling of the Taliban’s takeover of the Middle East nation.  

The protests come as Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab is put under renewed pressure to resign after new claims emerged accusing him of failing to engage with foreign counterparts on the Afghanistan situation until the Taliban had reached Kabul.

Mr Raab has faced calls to resign in recent days over his handling of the Afghanistan crisis.

Mr Johnson backed Mr Raab on Friday, but that was before claims surfaced in the Daily Mail suggesting Mr Raab did not pick up the phone to other foreign ministers until Sunday, the day the Afghan capital fell to insurgents, as he was on holiday.

Wearing a blue sweater, Boris Johnson’s toddler son Wilfred was today pictured on his father’s shoulders. The Prime Minister was seen getting out of his car in Downing Street with his young son after returning from a run this morning

Wilfred was born on April 29th 2020 at the height of the first Covid crisis in the UK.

Mr Jonson’s wife Carrie Johnson, 33, announced at the end of July that she is expecting a second child with her husband.   

Announcing the news on Instagram, Mrs Johnson revealed she had previously suffered a miscarriage by saying she was hoping for a ‘rainbow baby’ this Christmas.

Mr Johnson has been seen with his son on multiple occasions since his birth, which came just days after he was admitted to intensive care with coronavirus. 

The new baby announcement came just two days after Mr and Mrs Johnson tied the knot in a Catholic ceremony at Westminster Cathedral. 

The December arrival will mean the Prime Minister has at least seven children, though he has not officially confirmed the exact number after leading a tangled love life that has seen him married twice. 

At today’s protests, men and women let off green and red flares in the street, waved the country’s flag and held up huge banners during the protest.

The Taliban launched their final assault on Kabul on Sunday and seized power after President Ashraf Ghani fled to Dubai, reportedly with a wad of cash and luxury cars.

Wilfred was born on April 29th 2020 at the height of the first Covid crisis in the UK. Mr Jonson’s wife Carrie Johnson, 33, announced at the end of July that she is expecting a second child with her husband

The West’s immediate response has been widely criticised as it evacuates citizens but largely leaves Afghans in the hands of the brutal Islamists.

One banner said: ‘Stop oppression of Afghan women.’ Another read: ‘Talib has not changed.’ While one more added: ‘We want peace.’ The Metropolitan Police has been approached for comment.

Nato countries have been flying their citizens out of Afghanistan this week and it is believed 12,000 have so far been rescued.

But there have been raised eyebrows about the approach to Afghan civilians, with the criteria to get on an evacuation plane being widely questioned.  

Mr Raab came under further pressure as The Times reported that witnesses saw the Cabinet minister swimming and using a paddleboard on the last day of his break, which was spent at a beach at a five-star hotel on the Greek island of Crete.

Wilfred was born on April 29th 2020 at the height of the first Covid crisis in the UK

Mr Raab was already in the firing line after it emerged he delegated a call about repatriating Afghan interpreters, while away on August 13, to a junior minister, a decision that resulted in the phone conversation with the Afghan foreign minister not taking place and possibly delaying taking them to safety.

The Foreign Secretary returned to the UK on Monday to begin dealing with the unfolding debacle in person.

Asked about the latest allegations, the Foreign Office highlighted Mr Raab’s statement issued on Friday – comments made before the claims emerged.

Mr Raab earlier this week insisted he had been ‘talking to foreign counterparts’ while out of the country, as well as taking part in emergency Government Cobra meetings remotely and dealing with his team in London on an ‘hour-by-hour basis’.

Attempts to repatriate British nationals and Afghans who supported UK efforts in the country are continuing against the clock as the situation at Kabul airport appeared to worsen.

Mr Johnson has been seen with his son on multiple occasions since his birth, which came just days after he was admitted to intensive care with coronavirus. Above: Mr Johnson with Wilfred in January this year

Like father like son: Wilfred’s blond locks blow in the wind as Boris runs behind pet dog Dilyn in a field near Chequers in July

The US embassy in Afghanistan is recommending that US citizens avoid travelling to the airfield ‘because of potential security threats outside the gates’, with reports of violent scenes and overcrowding at the main entrance and at Taliban checkpoints.

Sky News said they had spoken to British troops at the airport who had served in Afghanistan previously, and who said the queues, crushing and desperation of people to get out of the country were the worst scenes they had witnessed during their service.

Time is running out to repatriate people to the UK ahead of US President Joe Biden’s August 31 deadline to withdraw most remaining US troops.

On Friday he did not commit to extending it, in a move that is likely to mean British troops must return home at the same time, as the airport cannot be held without US enforcement.

Mr Johnson was seen before thousands of protesters today rallied outside Downing Street to demonstrate against Britain’s response to the Afghanistan crisis 

Reports have suggested the last evacuation flight could be as soon as Tuesday, in order to give British troops enough time to leave safely.

The Prime Minister said 1,000 people had been brought to the UK on both Thursday and Friday, with most of them UK nationals or those who had assisted British efforts in Afghanistan.

Despite claims that the situation in the country is improving, a former Royal Marine-turned charity director in Afghanistan said he cannot get to Kabul airport without putting his life at risk.

The protests come as Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab is put under renewed pressure to resign after new claims emerged accusing him of failing to engage with foreign counterparts on the Afghanistan situation until the Taliban had reached Kabul

Paul Farthing, known as ‘Pen’, has been trying to get all of his 25 staff from animal welfare charity Nowzad, their families and more than 100 dogs and cats out of the country as the Taliban complete their takeover.

As the chaos at Kabul airport shows no sign of letting up, Mr Farthing said he feels ‘completely numb at the incompetence’ of the Government’s efforts so far.

Dominic Dyer, who has been campaigning for Mr Farthing, said that progress had been made in acquiring visas for all 68 people in his entourage.

But he added that the ‘main obstacle’ is still ‘getting through the airport’ where thousands of people are scrambling to escape. 

Thousands of protesters take over Downing Street, Oxford Circus and Hyde Park as they demonstrate the UK government’s handling of Afghanistan crisis

By James Gant for MailOnline 

Thousands of protestors have today descended on central London to demonstrate against Britain’s response to the Afghanistan crisis.

Marchers rallied outside Downing Street and took over Oxford Circus and Hyde Park as they criticised the government’s handling of the Taliban seizing the Middle East nation.

Men and women let off green and red flares in the street, waved the country’s flag and held up huge banners during the protest.

The Taliban launched their final assault on Kabul on Sunday and seized power after President Ashraf Ghani fled to Dubai, reportedly with a wad of cash and luxury cars.

The West’s immediate response has been widely criticised as it evacuates citizens but largely leaves Afghans in the hands of the brutal Islamists.

Scroll down for video.  

Thousands of protestors have today descended on central London to demonstrate against Britain’s response to the Afghanistan crisis

Marchers rallied outside Downing Street and took over Oxford Circus and Hyde Park as they criticised the government’s handling of the Taliban seizing the Middle East nation

Men and women let off green and red flares in the street, waved the country’s flag and held up huge banners during the protest

The Taliban launched their final assault on Kabul on Sunday and seized power after President Ashraf Ghani fled to Dubai, reportedly with a wad of cash and luxury cars

The West’s immediate response has been widely criticised as it evacuates citizens but largely leaves Afghans in the hands of the brutal Islamists

Protesters today braved the rain as they took to central London to call for Britain to do more to help stranded civilians and stand up to the terror group.

They walked down the road in a blur of red and green – two of the colours in the Afghanistan flag – after setting off flares.

One banner said: ‘Stop oppression of Afghan women.’ Another read: ‘Talib has not changed.’ While one more added: ‘We want peace.’ The Metropolitan Police has been approached for comment.

Nato countries have been flying their citizens out of Afghanistan this week and it is believed 12,000 have so far been rescued.

But there have been raised eyebrows about the approach to Afghan civilians, with the criteria to get on an evacuation plane being widely questioned.

Protesters today braved the rain as they took to central London to call for Britain to do more to help stranded civilians and stand up to the terror group

They walked down the road in a blur of red and green – two of the colours in the Afghanistan flag – after setting off flares

One banner said: ‘Stop oppression of Afghan women.’ Another read: ‘Talib has not changed.’ While one more added: ‘We want peace.’ The Metropolitan Police has been approached for comment

Nato countries have been flying their citizens out of Afghanistan this week and it is believed 12,000 have so far been rescued

But there have been raised eyebrows about the approach to Afghan civilians, with the criteria to get on an evacuation plane being widely questioned

Protesters are seen marching through London today amid the evacuation crisis in Afghanistan following the Taliban’s takeover

Several protesters wore bandanas on their heads which were in the colours of the Afghan flag. Behind, a bus is seen amid the throng of people 

Dominic Raab last night refused to apologise for failing to make a crucial phone call while he was on holiday to seek help for Afghan translators.

Boris Johnson insisted yesterday he ‘absolutely’ had full confidence in the Foreign Secretary as the Government mounted a frantic operation to shore up his precarious position.

But in an another damaging development last night, it emerged that Mr Raab did not call any of his foreign counterparts in the days leading up to the Taliban’s seizure of Kabul.

The Foreign Office had insisted he did not speak to the Afghan foreign minister last Friday – despite advice from senior officials – because he was ‘engaged on a range of other calls’.

But it is understood he just spoke to British officials and fellow ministers in the week before the Taliban took Kabul.

Mr Raab, who was staying at a luxury beach resort in Crete, only started making calls to his foreign counterparts on the Sunday afternoon once the insurgents had entered the Afghan capital. The Foreign Office last night declined to comment.

This woman was seen wiping away tears in London today as she joined those who were protesting at the Government’s response to the crisis in Afghanistan

One man was seen being carried on another’s shoulders as he carried the Afghan flag in Central London this afternoon

The men and women wound their way down Oxford Street and also carried out a rally outside the gates of Downing Street

One banner being held aloft by the protesters warned that the situation in Afghanistan could lead to ‘world wars’

The Mail revealed on Thursday that Mr Raab had been advised by senior officials to call Afghan foreign minister Hanif Atmar to help get Afghan translators out of the country.

But he failed to do this and the call was delegated to the on-duty minister Lord Goldsmith. The Daily Mail then revealed yesterday that the call in fact never actually took place.

Mr Raab said yesterday that ministers had been ‘working tirelessly’ over the past week to evacuate British nationals and Afghans.

In his first full statement on the affair, he confirmed he had been advised to contact Mr Atmar last Friday but said the ‘call was delegated to a minister of state because I was prioritising security and capacity at the airport’.

‘In any event, the Afghan foreign minister agreed to take the call, but was unable to because of the rapidly deteriorating situation,’ he added.

But last night the Foreign Secretary faced fresh criticism for failing to apologise or include any hint of contrition in his statement.

Dominic Raab last night refused to apologise for failing to make a crucial phone call while he was on holiday to seek help for Afghan translators

Boris Johnson insisted yesterday he ‘absolutely’ had full confidence in the Foreign Secretary as the Government mounted a frantic operation to shore up his precarious position

But in an another damaging development last night, it emerged that Mr Raab did not call any of his foreign counterparts in the days leading up to the Taliban ‘s seizure of Kabul

The Mail revealed on Thursday that Mr Raab had been advised by senior officials to call Afghan foreign minister Hanif Atmar to help get Afghan translators out of the country

Shadow Foreign Secretary Lisa Nandy said: ‘There is no defence for Dominic Raab’s shameful negligence and his failure to act may have cost lives. It is unbelievable that even now the Foreign Secretary is wasting time making excuses when a catastrophe is still unfolding in front of our eyes.’

Earlier, Lord Robertson, who was Nato secretary general on 9/11, accused Mr Raab of ‘a dereliction of duty of major consequence’. Asked if the Foreign Secretary’s statement had satisfactorily answered questions about his actions, the former defence secretary replied: ‘No, it doesn’t at all.’

He told BBC Radio 4’s World At One: ‘Foreign ministers only talk to foreign ministers – they don’t talk to junior ministers.

‘So he should have been talking to the foreign minister of Afghanistan much earlier than last Friday anyway.

‘Common sense would have suggested that the Foreign Secretary should have been trying to sort out the exit of our vulnerable people before that.’

The former Labour foreign secretary Jack Straw said he would never delegate a call with his Afghan counterpart to another minister and he was ‘surprised’ that Mr Raab did so.

But the Prime Minister last night dismissed calls to sack his Foreign Secretary. Asked if he had full confidence in Mr Raab, Mr Johnson said: ‘Absolutely.’

Asked if people had been left in Afghanistan as a result of Mr Raab not making the phone call, he said: ‘No, I don’t think that’s the case.’

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