Cops 'were called to Dr Krystal Cascetta's home before murder-suicide'

Cops and ambulances were called to Dr. Krystal Cascetta’s home at least TWICE before she ‘shot dead her baby and herself’ in murder-suicide

  • Dr. Krystal Cascetta, 40, allegedly killed her daughter before shooting herself
  • This was not the first time police and ambulances were called to her home 
  • Husband Timothy Talty, 37, was not home at the time – but her parents were

A mother who allegedly shot dead her infant daughter and then killed herself had police and ambulances called to her $1million home at least twice before the fatal ordeal, her neighbors revealed.  

Dr. Krystal Cascetta, 40, entered the baby’s room around 7am on Saturday in the town of Somers, which is in Westchester County, New York, and shot the child before turning the gun on herself. 

Cascetta’s husband, Timothy Talty, 37, was away at the time — but Cascetta’s parents were inside the house during the fatal shootings. 

This was not the first incident which required police and ambulance attention at the ‘very private’ family’s residence, according to their neighbors.  

Dr. Krystal Cascetta married Talty in 2019 at a celebration in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Their daughter was their only child. Police and ambulances had been called to their home previously, neighbors claimed

Cascetta, 40, entered the baby’s room around 7am on Saturday in the town of Somers, which is in Westchester County, New York, and shot the child before turning the gun on herself. The family’s $1million home is pictured

Bob Stuart, 71, who lived near the couple’s home, told the New York Post: ‘They had ambulances and police come to their house two, maybe three times this summer. At least twice.

‘I saw the police and ambulances arrive.’

Stuart’s wife, Betsy, added that the family were ‘very private people, kept to themselves,’ to the point that they hadn’t heard from them in nearly two years. 

The Stuarts said they didn’t even know that the doctor was pregnant.  

It has not been revealed why police and ambulances were previously called to the home.

Authorities also have not released the child’s age and sex, but an online registry suggests the infant was just 4-1/2 months old. 

Law enforcement officials later also told the Rockland/Westchester Journal News that the baby was a girl and the only child of Cascetta and an energy bar tycoon.

A motive for the murder-suicide has not yet been released, as friends and former patients of the New York City oncology doctor rally around her.

The couple’s neighbors described the young family as ‘very private’

Dr. Krystal Cascetta, 40, allegedly entered her baby’s room at around 7am Saturday and shot her daughter before turning the gun on herself

Cascetta had lived in the Granite Springs area of Somers in New York inside a $1 million home with her husband Tim Talty, pictured here. He was not home at the time of the murder/suicide

Dr. Cascetta, a hematology-oncology specialist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, had lived with Talty in the Granite Springs area of Somers in a home worth $1million.

On his Instagram page, Talty had shared images of the two in Austin, Texas, when he said Cascetta had came to visit him when they first started dating. 

The two had married in 2019 during a celebration in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, after what Talty described on social media as ‘so special.’

At the time, he said: ‘My Wife! It took us a year to plan and a lifetime to gather all of the wonderful people to make our wedding so special!’

He now runs his own energy bar company, called the Talty Bar, and had previously shared online how his wife used her medical and scientific knowledge to help advise on how to create the best product.

When contacted by DailyMail.com about his wife’s alleged crime, he only said: ‘Can you give us some time?’

Cascetta was a hematology-oncology specialist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City

The couple were ‘very private’ and neighbors hadn’t heard from them in two years

Cascetta was a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Hematology

Cascetta was a board-certified hematologist and medical oncologist in New York City, specializing in breast cancer.

As a resident in internal medicine at the Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine at North Shore University Hospital she received the Intern of the Year award. 

She had also served as Chief Fellow at Mount Sinai Hospital after completing a fellowship program in Hematology and Medical Oncology. 

Cascetta was a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Hematology. 

She had received her medical degree from Albany Medical College, where she was inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society for demonstrating excellence in humanistic clinical care, leadership, compassion, and dedication to service.

In a bio about Cascetta, the doctor was described as an avid runner and fitness enthusiast. 

It also says that being a doctor ‘was in her DNA,’ noting she was often found as a child wrapping her dolls in gauze. 

When she was in eighth grade, her mother’s best friend passed away from breast cancer, which is said to have spurred her on to pursue a career in medicine. 

She later became an active investigator of breast cancer clinical trials. 

Cascetta is pictured here at a discussion about breast cancer with her former patient, writer Kambri Crews

Her friends and patients remembered her Saturday night for her compassion

Her friends and patients remembered her Saturday night for her compassion, with Eri Barr posting on Facebook that she was ‘absolutely devastated’ by the news.

‘She was my friend at Albany Med and residency,’ Barr wrote. ‘I always looked up to her.’

Maureen Daly also remembered Cascetta as being ‘true to your profession.

‘You were caring and very compassionate to your patients,’ she posted of the doctor, adding: ‘I will miss our talks.’

Writer Kambri Crews wrote that Cascetta ‘was a star in her field, dedicated and lovely, whip smart and competitive athlete.’

‘Years after my cancer surgery, she and I hosted a breast cancer presentation, and she included me on some cutting-dg research and trials,’ Crews recounted. ‘Because of her, I opted to skip chemo as part of one study.

‘I don’t know what was happening in her life that she felt this was the best end to her story,’ the writer continued, ‘but I know a large community of survivors, patients and colleagues are broken-hearted. 

‘She deeply cared for her patients, and I am grateful that I was one.’ 

Source: Read Full Article