Jihadi jailed for London bomb plot could be FREE within months

Jihadi jailed for bomb plot on London Stock Exchange could be FREE within months: One of UK’s most dangerous terrorists who is friends with London Bridge killer Usman Khan is granted parole hearing after 10 years in prison

  • Nazam Hussain, 35, in trio dubbed ‘more serious jihadists’ when jailed in 2012
  • He, Khan and Mohammed Shahjahan, all of Stoke-on-Trent, arrested in 2010
  • The gang were behind the al-Qaeda-inspired plot set for Christmas Eve
  • Hussain’s appeal was adjourned on July 19 but could recommence later this year
  •  If he wins the appeal, Hussain would be released on licence a few weeks later

One of the UK’s most dangerous terrorists jailed for plotting an attack on the London Stock Exchange could be free in just a few months after he was granted a parole hearing.

Nazam Hussain, a close friend of London Bridge killer Usman Khan, was part of a trio dubbed ‘the more serious jihadists’ when they were jailed in 2012.

Hussain, 35, and his gang were behind an al-Qaeda-inspired plot to blow up the London Stock Exchange on Christmas Eve.

The plans involved a coordinated bomb-and-gun attack similar to the November 2008 attacks in Mumbai, India, which killed 175 people and injured more than 300.

Nazam Hussain,35, was part of a trio dubbed ‘the more serious jihadists’ when they were jailed in 2012

London Bridge killer Usman Khan (pictured) was released in December 2018. He was close friends with Nazam Hussain

Mohammed Shahjahan (pictured), from Stoke-on-Trent, was arrested on December 20, 2010, alongside Hussain and Khan

At the time of his jailing, Hussain was considered as dangerous as his co-conspirator Usman Khan, 28, who went on to kill Jack Merritt, 25, and 23-year-old Saskia Jones at Fishmongers’ Hall in central London in November 2019.

MailOnline can reveal the appeal was adjourned on July 19 for more reports by the intelligence service MI5, police and jail counter terrorism units.

No date has yet been set for the hearing to recommence, but it could be listed for later this year. If he wins the appeal, Hussain would be released on licence a few weeks later.

A spokesperson for the Parole Board said: ‘There are a number of situations where an adjournment may be required, for example more information is required, the prisoner needs more time to complete a course, a witness is not available, or for some other unavoidable reason.

‘The Parole Board does everything it can to avoid these delays.

Fishmongers Hall attacker Usman Khan is seen being detained by police and bystanders

Usman Khan, 28, went on to kill Jack Merritt (left), 25, and 23-year-old Saskia Jones (right) at Fishmongers’ Hall in central London in November 2019

‘Any decision to adjourn an oral hearing must be recorded in writing with reasons, and that record must be provided to the prisoner and/or their legal representative and the Secretary of State no more than 14 days after the date of that decision.

‘Parole Board decisions are solely focused on what risk a prisoner could represent to the public if released and whether that risk is manageable in the community.

‘The panel will carefully examine a whole range of evidence, including details of the original crime, and any evidence of behaviour change, as well as understand the harm done and impact the crime has had on the victims.

‘Parole reviews are undertaken thoroughly and with extreme care. Protecting the public is our number one priority.’

Hussain, Khan and Mohammed Shahjahan, all from Stoke-on-Trent, were arrested on December 20, 2010.

The trio were part of a self-contained radical cell preaching an extreme version of Islam on the streets of Tunstall and Cobridge, in Staffordshire.

The intelligence services recorded them talking about blowing up pub toilets in Stoke-on-Trent and also discussing how they would raise funds for their terrorist training.

The three men – all British-born and of Pakistani origin – were also part of a terrorist network, which also involved cells in London and Cardiff who were planning to attack the London Stock Exchange.

Bugs hidden in their cars and other covert recording techniques allowed MI5 to listen in on many of their conversations after the three cells met up in Cwn Carn Country Park in Newport, Wales, in 2010.

On January 31, 2012, Hussain, Khan and Shahjahan pleaded guilty to engaging in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism.

The November 2008 attacks in Mumbai, India, killed 175 people and injured more than 300

Judge Mr Justice Wilkie said at the time these three were ‘the more serious jihadists’ and said they should not be released until they were no longer a threat to the public.

Passing sentence, he added this was a ‘serious, long-term venture in terrorism’ that could also have resulted in atrocities in the UK.

‘It was envisaged by them all that ultimately they and the other recruits may return to the UK as trained and experienced terrorists available to perform terrorist attacks in this country, on one possibility contemplated in the context of the return of British troops from Afghanistan.’

They were sentenced to either eight years or eight years and eight months, but under indeterminate sentences for public protection (IPPs).

These special sentences meant they could be kept in prison beyond their original minimum term.

Upon appeal they were given fixed terms.

Both Hussain and Khan were ordered to serve at least eight years of their new 16-year-sentence. Khan was released in December 2018 and it is believed Hussain was released at the same time.

(From L to R) upper row: Mohammed Moksudur Chowdhury, Mohammed Shahjahan, Shah Mohammed Rahman, middle row: Mohibur Rahman, Gurukanth Desai, Abdul Malik Miah, lower row: Nazam Hussain, Usman Khan, Omar Sharif Latif

Hussain was returned to prison in November 2019 following a review of terrorists released on licence in the wake of the London Bridge attack on November 29, 2019.

He was held in prison for a suspected violation of conditions of his release.

MailOnline can reveal that Hussain is currently held in maximum security HMP Wakefield, West Yorkshire.

Four others pleaded guilty to engaging in conduct in preparation for acts of terrorism by planning to plant a bomb in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange

They were Gurukanth Desai, 30 at the time, from Cardiff, jailed for 12 years, Abdul Miah, then 25, from Cardiff, sentenced to 16 years and 10 months, Mohammed Chowdhury, 22, from London, imprisoned for 13 years, 8 months and Shah Rahman, 28, also from London, who got 12 years.

At the 2012 trial, Omar Latif, then aged 28, from Cardiff, admitted attending meetings with the intention of assisting others to prepare or commit acts of terrorism. He was given a sentence of 10 years and 4 months.

Mohibur Rahman, 28, from London, was given a five-year sentence after he admitted to possessing two editions of an al-Qaeda magazine for terrorist purposes.

Since the introduction of the Terrorist Offenders (Restriction of Early Release) Act 2020, at least 117 cases have been referred to the Parole Board.

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