London flash floods update – Watch as cars SWAMPED in horror downpours as Peterborough & Chiswick flooded too – LATEST

FLASH flooding hit parts of London and the South yesterday, leaving a trail of destruction as the Capital is battered by torrential showers.

A month's worth of rain poured down in places in just one hour yesterday – with London Fire Brigade since inundated with over 1000 calls regarding reports of flooding.

Drivers were forced to abandon their vehicles as the roads were engulfed while residents battled through deep floodwater in their homes.

Water even gushed down into the Underground, forcing the circle line train to reverse at Baker Street station.

Other unbelievable footage from the capital shows water surging down the steps at Chelsea's Sloane Square tube station -while pictures also showed people swimming in ponds created by the thunderstorms on Primrose Hill.

Flood alerts remain in place for four areas including Merton, Sutton, Kingston upon Thames, Richmond upon Thames and Wandsworth.

Read our London floods live blog below for the latest news and information…

  • [email protected]

    YELLOW WEATHER WARNING IN PLACE FOR LARGE PART OF SOUTHERN ENGLAND

    The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for rain for a large part of southern England.

    The affected area stretches from Devon in the west, all along the south coast as far as East Anglia and as far north as Cambridgeshire and almost to Bristol.

    Flood alerts are in place for four areas, including Beverley Brook in the south London borough of Merton, Sutton, Kingston upon Thames, Richmond upon Thames and Wandsworth.

  • Joseph Gamp

    'WATER WAS COMING UP FROM THE DRAINS'

    Lilian's granddaughter Sophie Yerby, 32, told The Sun: "It was rising quite quickly. We were really frightened to think, "What are we going to do, how are we going to get her out?"

    "The fireman came and he said, 'stay put, no one is allowed to move'.  It was only until our neighbour knocked and said his flat had been flooded.

    "We all ran downstairs and there was about two feet of water by then. It was just pouring in.

    "It was like Titanic, when the water gushes through. It was awful. The water was coming up through the drains.

    "The whole house is destroyed. We have had to throw all the beds, my nan's wheelchair, all of her valuable photos, all her husband's birth death certificates,everything.

  • Joseph Gamp

    FAMILY DEVASTATED AS FLASH FLOODS LEAVE 100-YEAR-OLD OAP’S LONDON HOME SUBMERGED ‘LIKE THE TITANIC’’ UNDER 3FT WATER

    A FAMILY have been left "devastated" after torrential rain flooded their home under three feet of water.

    The basement of their four-floor home in Maida Vale, North West London, was swamped as water poured in last night "like the Titanic".

    They waded through wastewater gushing from the toilet and pipes into the home where four generations of the same family – including a 100-year-old great great grandmother – live.

    Carpets, furniture and clothes in the basement flat have been ruined, with a bed floating in a submerged room as biblical flash floods battered the capital.  

    Precious family photos belonging to 100-year-old Lilian Humphrey, along with her wheelchair, have also been destroyed.

    Read more here.

  • Joseph Gamp

    WATCH: FLASH FLOODS LEAVE 100-YEAR-OLD OAP’S LONDON HOME SUBMERGED 'LIKE THE TITANIC’' UNDER 3FT WATER

    Family devastated as flash floods leave 100-year-old OAP’s London home submerged ‘like the Titanic’’ under 3ft water

  • Joseph Gamp

    IN PICTURES: PORTOBELLO ROAD CLEAN UP CONTINUES

    Torrential rain and flash flooding caused properties and shops to flood last night as up to a month’s rain fell in an hour over parts of London.Credit: LNP

     

  • Joseph Gamp

    WHICH AREAS OF LONDON ARE AT MOST RISK OF FLOODING?

    According to a 2015 report, around 300,000 homes across multiple boroughs are deemed to be at most risk of flooding from the Thames and the capital’s numerous other rivers.

    These areas include:

    • Hammersmith and Fulham
    • Newham,
    • Tower Hamlets,
    • Barking,
    • Dagenham,
    • Southwark,
    • Greenwich,
    • Richmond upon Thames,
    • Wandsworth,
    • Bexley and Lewisham.

    YELLOW WEATHER WARNING IN PLACE FOR LARGE PART OF SOUTHERN ENGLAND

    The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for rain for a large part of southern England.

    The affected area stretches from Devon in the west, all along the south coast as far as East Anglia and as far north as Cambridgeshire and almost to Bristol.

    Flood alerts are in place for four areas, including Beverley Brook in the south London borough of Merton, Sutton, Kingston upon Thames, Richmond upon Thames and Wandsworth.

    EXPLAINED: WHAT IS THE THAMES BARRIER RIVER DEFENCE SYSTEM

    Opened in 1982, The Thames Barrier is a barrier system  designed to prevet Greater London from being flooded by high tides from the North Sea.

    It is retractable and is the world’s second-largest movable flood barrier, 

    It is raised (closed) only during high tide at ebb tide it is lowered to release the water which backs up behind it.

    Despite global warming, and a higher predicted rate of sea level rise, recent analysis suggested the barrier could last until around 2060–2070.

    QUEEN GUITARIST BRIAN MAY SHARES FOOTAGE OF 'DEVASTATION' AFTER WEST LONDON HOME IS FLOODED

    • Joseph Gamp

      HERE COMES THE SUN

      Things will start to look up today as high pressures moves in, just in time for a balmy weekend, says Met Office meteorologist Steven Keates.

      The only exception to the dry sunny skies will be the North East coast where wind off the North Sea will make seasides towns from Newcastle up to Aberdeen more chilly and cloudy this week.

      After a largely dry night tonight, Tuesday will see a cloudy start but some places will see quite a bit of sunshine and start to get warmer.

      Expect 20C in London, with 22-23C across the West Country and cooler temperatures on the North Sea coast, with 18C-17C where still it’ll stay more glum.

      The trend will stay looking into Wednesday.

    • Joseph Gamp

      FLASH FLOODS ACROSS LONDON CAUSE TRAVEL CHAOS

      Flash floods have caused travel chaos in the capital as a number of London train and tube stations were forced to close.

      Euston Station lines had to be shut down after the intense downpours on Monday evening, with people unable to travel in or out of the city via the major transport hub.

      Underground stations, including Chalk Farm and Hampstead stations in north London and Wimbledon in the south, have also drawn their barriers due to the heavy rainfall.

      One video posted on Twitter shows water pouring in down the stairs at Sloane Square tube station.

      Cars were also filmed struggling to make their way through streets that appear to have turned into rivers after several inches of rainwater.

    • Joseph Gamp

      BRIAN MAY SHARES IMAGES OF 'DEVASTATION' IN HIS FLOODED LONDON HOME

      Brian May has said he is "angry" after a number of his "precious" belongings were ruined during the flooding of his London home.

      There were flash floods in the capital on Tuesday following intense downpours the previous night.

      Queen guitarist May, 73, said he came home from a day out to "horror in our house" in Kensington, west London.

      In a post on Instagram, he added: "The whole bottom floor had been inundated with a sewage overflow – which has covered our carpets, rugs and all kinds of precious (to us) things in a stinking sludge. It's disgusting, and actually quite heartbreaking. It feels like we were have been invaded, desecrated."

      He said his wife Anita Dobson had "a lifetime of memorabilia on the floor of our basement – and most of it is sodden and ruined".

    • Joseph Gamp

      WHICH AREAS OF LONDON ARE AT MOST RISK OF FLOODING?

      According to a 2015 report, around 300,000 homes across multiple boroughs are deemed to be at most risk of flooding from the Thames and the capital’s numerous other rivers.

      These areas include:

      • Hammersmith and Fulham
      • Newham,
      • Tower Hamlets,
      • Barking,
      • Dagenham,
      • Southwark,
      • Greenwich,
      • Richmond upon Thames,
      • Wandsworth,
      • Bexley and Lewisham.

      IN PICTURES: MANHOLE EXPLODES DURING YESTERDAY'S LONDON FLOODING

      YELLOW WEATHER WARNING IN PLACE FOR LARGE PART OF SOUTHERN ENGLAND

      The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for rain for a large part of southern England.

      The affected area stretches from Devon in the west, all along the south coast as far as East Anglia and as far north as Cambridgeshire and almost to Bristol.

      Flood alerts are in place for four areas, including Beverley Brook in the south London borough of Merton, Sutton, Kingston upon Thames, Richmond upon Thames and Wandsworth.

      • Joseph Gamp

        ENVIRONMENT AGENCY ISSUES SEVEN FLOOD WARNINGS

        The Environment Agency has issued seven flood alerts for Upper River Loddon; River Hamble; River Brent from Hendon to Brentford; Lower River Lee from Hoddesdon to Canning Town; the Lower Lee tributaries; Eastern Yar and Beverley Brook area in Merton, Sutton, Kingston upon Thames, Richmond upon Thames and Wandsworth.

      • Joseph Gamp

        TROUBLED & CONCERNED TORY MP 'IN CONTACT' WITH THAMES WATER OVER CHELSEA AND KENSINGTON FLOODING

      • Joseph Gamp

        EXPLAINED: WHAT IS THE THAMES BARRIER RIVER DEFENCE SYSTEM

        Opened in 1982, The Thames Barrier is a barrier system  designed to prevet Greater London from being flooded by high tides from the North Sea.

        It is retractable and is the world's second-largest movable flood barrier, 

        It is raised (closed) only during high tide at ebb tide it is lowered to release the water which backs up behind it.

        Despite global warming, and a higher predicted rate of sea level rise, recent analysis suggested the barrier could last until around 2060–2070.

      • Joseph Gamp

        LONDON'S RIVER THAMES LAST BURST IT'S BANKS IN 1928

        The 1928 Thames flood is the last time the capitals most prominent river burst its banks.

        Fourteen people died and thousands were made homeless when floodwaters poured over the over embankments at Southwark, Lambeth, Temple Pier and the Houses of Parliament, where Old Palace Yard and Westminster Hall were quickly flooded.

        Icnonic landmraks including the Houses of Parliament, the Tate Gallery and the Tower of London were surrounded by water.

        "It came like a waterfall over the parapet and into the space at the foot of Big Ben," wrote a Times correspondent.

        Along with the disastrous North Flood of 1953 and the political unrest that ensued, the flood helped lead to the implementation of new flood-control measures. Those plans culminated in the construction of the Thames Barrier in in the 1970s.

      • Joseph Gamp

        HOW TO GET FLOOD ALERTS IN LONDON

        The Government has a flood warning information service which will give you an idea of which regions are at risk of flooding.

      • Joseph Gamp

        HISTORY: WHEN HAS LONDON BEEN HIT BY FLASH FLOODS BEFORE?

        • 1928 – The capital was hit by a serious flood as a combination of melting snow, a high tide, and a storm surge caused the Thames river to burst its banks, devastating central London.
        • 1953 – During the tragic North Sea Flood, London was just one of the a number of areas affected across the country and across Europe.  Water overspilled the Royal Docks and drained into the sewers – flooding Canning Town. One person died as hundreds were made homeless.
        • 2013 – 2014 Thousands of people had to be evacuated from their homes after what was considered the stormiest December since 1969. Months later a South Devon railway sea wall carrying the railway linking London with the west of England was washed away by a powerful storm that hit the UK overnight. Thousands of homes were left without electricity
        • 2021 – A month's worth of rain poured down in areas of London places in just one hour – with severe flooding wreaking havoc in Raynes Park as cars became submerged in the water.
        • Joseph Gamp

          MAPPED: THE AREAS OF LONDON MOST AT RISK OF FLOODING?

        • Joseph Gamp

          WHICH AREAS OF LONDON ARE AT MOST RISK OF FLOODING?

          According to a 2015 report, around 300,000 homes across multiple boroughs are deemed to be at most risk of flooding from the Thames and the capital’s numerous other rivers.

          These areas include:

          • Hammersmith and Fulham
          • Newham,
          • Tower Hamlets,
          • Barking,
          • Dagenham,
          • Southwark,
          • Greenwich,
          • Richmond upon Thames,
          • Wandsworth,
          • Bexley and Lewisham.

          ODDS ON FOR WETTEST JULY ON RECORD AFTER FLASH FLOODS

          Bookmaker Coral now makes this July odds on, at 1-2, to be the wettest since records began as parts of London had more rainfall in 24 hours than the average for the whole of the month.

          The average monthly rainfall in July is 44.5mm, with some areas enduring nearly 48mm.

          "Many parts of the UK escaped with a dry Monday but the capital endured some of the heaviest rain it has ever had and it means this month is now odds on to enter the record books as the wettest July ever following a remarkable 24 hours," said Coral's Harry Aitkenhead.

          Coral do make this July only 5-4 to also enter the record books as the UK's hottest ever, with a heatwave now expected.

          "In keeping with the unpredictability of the British weather, there's also every chance of this month being our warmest July with temperatures set to soar towards the middle of the month," added Aitkenhead.

          CONTINUING DISRUPTION TO LONDON OVERGROUND SERVICES

          Network Rail added that the line between Kilburn Junction and Euston remains blocked, which will affect London Overground services throughout the day.

          “We’d advise everyone to check their journey before they travel."

            Source: Read Full Article