Moment man on e-scooter narrowly avoids being hit by taxi

Moment man on e-scooter riding illegally on road narrowly avoids being hit by taxi as he crosses mini-roundabout without giving way

  • A taxi driver has hit out at e-scooter riders after two near misses in four minutes
  • Video shows one rider go straight over mini-roundabout before shouting abuse
  • In second incident, video shows e-scooter run red light and almost hit a cyclist
  • Met says e-scooters are dangerous and privately-owned ones are illegal on roads

This is the moment a hooded man on an e-scooter riding illegally on the road is almost hit by a taxi as he crosses a mini-roundabout without giving way.

The taxi driver working in central London said he witnessed two near misses in the space of just four minutes as e-scooter riders flouted the law on the capital’s roads.

In the first video, both of which were caught on the taxi driver’s dashcam, the driver approaches a mini-roundabout at the Nothing Hill Gate junction of Kensington Park Road and Pembridge Road.

As the driver, who has asked to remain anonymous, enters the roundabout, a hooded e-scooter rider scoots straight into the car’s path.

The video shows the rider slow down temporarily only to shout abuse at the taxi driver before carrying on his way.

Privately owned e-scooters are banned from pavements, roads and cycle paths under the 1835 Highway Act, but can be used on private land with the landowner’s permission.

Riding rental e-scooters on the road and on cycle paths became legal in the UK on July 4 last year, but the machines have a top speed of 15.5mph.

You must have a driving licence or a provisional driving licence and be at least 16 years old to hire an electric scooter.

In the second incident caught on the taxi driver’s dash cam, an e-scooter rider runs a red light and is almost hit by a delivery cyclist as he speeds through the intersection on Chepstow Road.

The taxi driver says he experiences similar incidents on a daily, if not hourly, basis and that something more needs to be done ‘urgently’ to tackle the ‘growing danger’. 

Chief Superintendent Simon Ovens, from the Met’s Road and Transport Policing Command, said e-scooters remain ‘notoriously dangerous’  and that privately-owned e-scooters remain illegal on roads and in public places.

Chf Supt Ovens told MailOnline: ‘I believe that some people are using e-scooters as an attractive mode of transport, especially in their commute to work, but they remain notoriously dangerous, and illegal when driven in public areas or on the roads.

‘Under the Road Traffic Act 1988, it is the equivalent of riding a motorcycle on the road without any MOT, tax or insurance.

In a second incident (full video below), a rider, again riding on the road illegally, runs a red light

Pictured: After running the red light, the e-scooter rider is almost hit by a delivery cyclist

‘If you are out on an e-scooter in London, expect to be stopped by officers as we continue to help keep Londoners safe.’

The Met say they will take enforcement action against those caught flouting the law and punishment could include a Fixed Penalty Notice for riding with no insurance, with a £300 fine and six penalty points.

Riders could also be issued with a Fixed Penalty Notice for driving without a licence, up to £100 fine and three-six penalty points.

The force has also said action will be taken against poor rider behaviour – whether on a private or rented e-scooter – including £100 fine for running a red light or £50 for riding on the footpath. 

The Government is currently conducting a trial of e-scooter rental fleets in cities across the country with a view to legalisation.

Last year, the Met said a trial in London is likely to begin in the spring of 2021 but an official date has yet to be confirmed.

The Times has reported that they are expected to be deployed in 11 out of 33 London boroughs in May. 

When the trial comes in in London, it will be legal to use the rental e-scooters, from specific companies, on the road.

Milton Keynes and Birmingham have successfully launched the scheme and last year York City Council announced it was working with Tier Mobility to deploy 50 e-scooters in the city.

However in Coventry the scheme was axed after just five days when riders flouted rules by mounting pavements.

What is the law on riding electric scooters in the UK?

E-scooters are classified as Personal Light Electric Vehicles (PLEVs), which means they are subject to all the same legal requirements including MOT, tax and licensing.

According to the Department of Transport, it is illegal to ride privately-owned electric scooters on the pavement, roads and cycle paths.

You can only ride your own e-scooter on private land, with permission from the person who owns the land. 

Privately-owned e-scooters cannot be legally ridden on the roads because they don’t always have visible rear red lights, number plates or signal ability 

Riding rental e-scooters on the roads and cycle paths became legal in the UK on July 4 last year but they are still illegal to ride on the motorway.    

Riding these scooters on pavements will also remain illegal and will only be allowed in pre-approved locations where the hiring scheme is taking place.    

E-scooters are classified as Personal Light Electric Vehicles (PLEVs), which means they are subject to all the same legal requirements including MOT, tax and licensing

You must have a driving licence or a provisional driving licence and be at least 16 years old to hire an electric scooter.

They will be limited to a maximum speed of 15.5mph.

E-scooter riders caught flouting the law could face a Fixed Penalty Notice for riding with no insurance, with a £300 fine and six penalty points.

Riders could also be issued with a Fixed Penalty Notice for driving without a licence, up to £100 fine and three-six penalty points.

The Government is currently conducting a trial of electric, or e-scooter, rental fleets in cities across the country with a view to legalisation.

Milton Keynes and Birmingham have successfully launched the scheme and last year York City Council announced it was working with Tier Mobility to deploy 50 e-scooters in the city.

In Coventry the scheme was axed after just five days when riders flouted rules by mounting pavements.

Another pilot in Hartlepool was scrapped before it even got started. 

Up to 36 towns and cities have signed up to the Department for Transport’s 12-month scheme, which makes it legal to ride e-scooters on roads – however, they need to be rented and need to be capped at 15.5mph. 

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