Prince Andrew FINALLY concedes proper service in Virginia Giuffre suit

Prince Andrew FINALLY concedes proper service of legal papers in Virginia Giuffre’s sexual assault lawsuit as he seeks extension of his deadline to respond to October 29

  • Andrew’s attorneys conceded proper service of process in legal filing on Friday
  • Filing in New York court requests extension of response deadline to October 29
  • Asks for cancellation of October 13 hearing set for arguments over procedure
  • Last week Andrew had claimed documents left at Windsor manor were improper 
  • Latest move sets up a court battle between the British Royal and his accuser

Prince Andrew has officially conceded proper service of process in the New York lawsuit filed against him by accuser Virginia Giuffre.

In a joint stipulation filed on Friday in Manhattan federal court, Andrew’s attorneys said that they had received copies of the summons and complaint in the suit, which alleges sexual assault and sexual battery.

The concession follows a lengthy battle in which Andrew was accused of attempting to evade responding to the allegations in court by claiming that legal papers in the case had not been properly delivered to him. Publicly he has always denied Giuffre’s allegations.

The new stipulation signed by attorneys from both sides in the case requests the cancellation of an October 13 preliminary hearing, which had been set to argue over process service questions.

Prince Andrew’s attorneys confirmed in a court filing that they had received copies of the summons and complaint in Virginia Giuffre’s lawsuit

Prince Andrew has conceded proper service of process in the New York lawsuit filed against him by Virginia Giuffre. Pictured: The Duke of York with Virginia Roberts, as she was know at the time aged 17, and Ghislaine Maxwell in London 

It also sets the date for effective service of process as of September 21.

Under standard procedure, Andrew’s legal team would normally have 21 days to file a response to the initial complaint, meaning the deadline would be October 12.

The new filing requests that his response deadline be extended until October 29, a concession that Guiffre’s team agreed to in return for a guarantee that Andrew would not attempt to challenge service of process. 

US District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan will now have to rule on the joint request, which he is likely to accept as both parties in the case have agreed to it. 

The filing confirms that attorneys for the two sides met by telephone on September 21 to hammer out the agreement, as sources told the Daily Mail earlier this week.

The latest development sets up Andrew, who is ninth in line to the British throne, for for a dramatic US court battle with his accuser. 

Sources tell the Daily Mail that the Duke intends to ‘come out fighting’ and use the civil court battle to repudiate Giuffre’s accusations ‘point by point, claim by claim’ and, they hope, clear his name. 

In a joint stipulation filed on Friday in Manhattan federal court, Andrew’s attorneys said that they had received copies of the summons and complaint in the suit

Giuffre, also known as Virginia Roberts, has accused the prince of having sex with her on three occasions when she was 17, knowing she had been trafficked by his close friend, the convicted sex predator Jeffrey Epstein. 

Giuffre alleges that she was trafficked by Jeffrey Epstein (above) and that Andrew had sex with her knowing this

Andrew has strongly denied the accusations. But many in the prince’s circle are said to believe the attempts to skirt responding to the allegations in court have been both a legal and a PR disaster, allowing Giuffre’s lawyers to outwit and outplay them at every turn.

For one person to sue another in a civil case, the claimant has to formally present legal papers to the other party to notify them of the action – also known as a service of process. 

The feud over the technicality began last week when Andrew’s lawyer claimed that the legal papers had not been properly served in the UK, after they were left with a policeman at the gate of his Windsor mansion.  

Giuffre’s attorney David Boies has scathingly described the actions of the opposing legal team as a ‘game of hide and seek behind palace walls’.

Even Judge Kaplan made clear his irritation at the delay tactics last week, telling the prince’s US attorney Andrew B. Brettler: ‘Let’s cut out all the technicalities and get to the substance.’ 

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