UK storm forecast: ‘Days of persistent rain’ to thrash Britain with 54mm in 24hrs – charts

BBC Weather: Kirkwood forecasts showers and strong gales

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The latest weather maps from WXCHARTS show torrential downpours drenching large parts of Britain next Thursday (October 28), with 5mm rain battering the southwest coast of England. This rain will ease in the hours following, quickly drifting eastwards across England and then over the North Sea and beyond. But any hopes of a relatively dry weekend are short-lived, with the latest maps from WXCHARTS showing a huge band of heavy rain travelling in from the Atlantic early next Saturday morning (October 31).

Most of the UK map turns orange and even red, suggesting up to 10mm of rain could drown large parts of the country within hours.

A separate weather chart from Netweather shows that on midday next Sunday (October 31), 54mm of rain is forecast to fall in an area of North Wales and more than 50mm in North West England.

Met Office meteorologist Alex Deakin said low pressure will begin to be driven towards the UK from Tuesday onwards, with the accompanying low-pressure systems bringing spells of rain.

But he warned with the “amplifying jet stream, that means things could get stuck”.

This means there is a chance of one weather system across northern parts of the UK “getting stuck”, which could bring persistent rain for a number of days”.

Mr Deakin said: “From Tuesday onwards, low-pressure areas being driven in by the jet streams.

“The highest pressure will be down to the south, which is where the driest weather is likely to be.

“But these low-pressure systems moving in will bring spells of rain across the country and always likely to be wettest across the northwest.

“With the amplifying jet stream, that means things could get stuck.

“So there is a possibility of one weather system lying somewhere across the north of the UK and getting stuck, which could bring persistent rain for a number of days.”

The Met Office has also said on its website Atlantic systems will continue to move in from the west and trigger “heavy rain and strong, locally gale force winds”.

Furthermore, “locally large rainfall accumulations” are possible, with the rest of the month continuing to see unsettled conditions rushing in from the Atlantic, with potential rain for many.

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The Met Office said: “Through the first few days of this period, Atlantic systems will continue to move in from the west, bringing heavy rain and strong, locally gale force winds.

“Some rainbands could become slow-moving with locally large rainfall accumulations possible, particularly over western hills.

“The rest of October will continue to see unsettled and windy weather arriving from the Atlantic, with outbreaks of potentially heavy rain for many.

“Wettest in the west and northwest, but still with brief dry interludes. Driest conditions likely across some south and southeastern areas.”

For next week, BBC Weather has also warned of the impact of low-pressure systems heading towards the UK, which could bring “frequent rain, stormy days, and changeable day-to-day temperatures”.

The forecast warns the jet stream “will be stronger, pushing weather systems through quicker with shorter dry spells between”.

BBC Weather said: “The final week of October should carry on much as this week will, with low-pressure systems moving into the UK from the west or northwest and bringing frequent rain, stormy days, and changeable day-to-day temperatures.

“The jet stream, the ribbon of fast-moving air in the upper atmosphere that drives weather systems, will be stronger, pushing weather systems through quicker with shorter dry spells between.

“Temperatures will be changeable but it won’t stay mild or cold for long before the next front pushes in.”

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