Visitors risk their lives peering over Birling Gap cliffs

Mind the gap! Visitors risk their lives peering over edge of 500ft Birling Gap cliffs despite warnings on crumbling cliffs where student died posing for photo in 2017

  • Hyewon Kim was 23 years old when she tumbled 200ft to her death after jumping in the air for a photograph  
  • The South Korean student asked a passer-by to take her picture but lost her footing as she landed on the cliff 
  • Each year more than 350,000 people visit Birling Gap, but there have been a number of cliff falls in the past

Visitors are continuing to ignore the warning signs of crumbling cliffs by peering over the edge of the 500ft Birling Gap where a student died posing for a photo in 2017.

Hyewon Kim was 23 years old when she tumbled 200ft to her death after jumping in the air for a photograph on the Seven Sisters cliffs.

The South Korean student, who had come to Britain to improve her English, asked a passer-by to take her picture but lost her footing as she landed and fell over the cliffs. 

In August last year, the Birling Cliff was also forced to temporarily close due a substantial cliff fall.

But these incidents have failed to deter tourists from seeking the ‘Hollywood shot’ as these photos show families and friends crawling right up to the cliff edge and leaning over.

Each year more than 350,000 people visit Birling Gap for its spectacular views, but there have been a number of cliff falls in recent years. 

A couple take a selfie near the edge of the cliffs at Birling Gap near Eastboune, Sussex, as warnings are ignored about the dangers of the crumbling chalk cliffs that can collapse without warning



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Hyewon Kim was 23 years old when she tumbled 200ft to her death after jumping in the air for a photograph on the Seven Sisters cliffs

Two tourists take photographs of Birling Gaps’ stunning chalk cliffs, but have little regard for their own safety as they stand near the edge 

A young boy is held back by an adult as he tries to get closer to the edge while other tourists sit only metres away from the cliff with their backs turned

A family take a selfie near the cliff edge with their backs turned, in spite of warnings from the Birling Gap and Seven Sisters website, which states: ‘It isn’t safe to sit or stand close to the edge of the cliffs as they may be unstable or undercut in places’

A couple, seemingly oblivious to the ‘cliff edge’ warning sign beside them, pose for a photo a mere few inches from the Birling gap cliff edge

A view of one of the many rock falls to have occurred near Birling Gap in recent years which has resulted in closures

A newlywed couple pose for a photograph with another man lying down on the ground taking the shot in spite of his proximity to the cliff edge

As several other tourists follow the path inside of the cliff, the married couple blithely ignore cliff edge warnings to get their dream shot

Visitors and crows populate the cliff edge in spite of the fact that a cliff fall can shed hundreds of thousands of tons of chalk on the beach below, according to the Birling Gap website

The Birling Gap and Seven Sisters website notes that chalk cliffs erode as much as 60 centimetres per year and their white appearance is a result of their constant erosion

Birling Gap and Seven Sisters is also only a short walk away from Beachy Head, where there are said to be around 20 deaths a year 

A young couple appear dangerously unaware of the cliff safety hazard and both drop their heads over the edge to peer down onto the beach below

A man strides along the edge of the Birling Gap cliff edge which attracts more than 350,000 people each year for its spectacular views

One couple look on with concerned faces as the young couple stare directly over the cliff while another couple in the background lie down only metres away

A couple take a selfie beside a stone wall dividing the Birley Gap cliffs but the website warns that it is just as unsafe to ‘stay away from the base of the cliffs when walking on the beach in case of cliff falls’

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